Buying a Used Car? Look for These Red Flags!

Buying a used car is a great way to save money and take advantage of depreciation but there are inherently more risks involved when a car has belonged to multiple owners.

Honest and Professional Pre-purchase Car Inspection in Melbourne, VIC

We have been in the automotive industry since 1984, ranging from apprentice, through to master technician, workshop foreman, controller, service advisor and service manager, in numerous premium vehicle businesses. We have built a level of loyalty that in the 21st Century is vital. After all, customer service and care is a point of difference.

We hope we are able to help you out with your needs. Our business is also known as Prepurchase Check.


Incomplete Paperwork

Specific paperwork is required to make your vehicle transaction legal. It serves as an agreement between buyer and seller. The correct paperwork ensures that the vehicle you are purchasing is legally registered and in fair condition. This includes a comprehensive service and repair history report.

Whether purchasing from a Dealer or in the private market you should expect to inspect from the seller, the service books and history of the car. A logbook that contains a full-service history with accompanying records and shows the most recent services is like gold when seeking to purchase a car.

Vehicle registration papers identifying the current registered owner or previous owner if purchasing from a dealer to ensure there is the correct legal title. Obtaining a PPSR Report will also identify if the car has been previously stolen, is an Economic Repairable Write-off or still has finance owing on it from the previous owners. Missing paperwork indicates that there may be some issues with the vehicle’s function or road history, so if the paperwork is incomplete, reconsider the deal.

Excessive Rust

Almost anything on a car can be fixed or replaced. The question is, should it be? When it comes to excessive rust, the answer is often no. While rusted out body panels can be replaced, it’s expensive and time-consuming. Rust on the frame means that the frame—the very bedrock of the car—is rotting away. Replacing a car’s frame, even if you just replace part of it, is expensive and runs the risk of weakening the car overall. While some rust is to be expected on a used car, look out for excessive rust with bits of metal flaking off, and avoid cars with rust in key areas. Let’s put it this way: some rust on the floor pan is OK, but if Fred Flintstone could drive the car, you’re better off walking away.

Warning Lights

We’ve all driven around for a week or two with the check engine light on in our car. After all, if the car is running it’s easy to overlook a light on the dashboard. And, sometimes those lights do come on because of a bad sensor or because we didn’t tighten the gas cap enough.

Still, if you’re looking to buy a used car that has a dashboard that looks like a Christmas tree, that’s enough of a red flag that you should reconsider. Sure, the lights could be on for a minor reason (again, that tricky gas cap), but they also could be on because of a bigger problem. If you really love the car, a trusty inspection from a professional inspector like German Precision can tell you if those lights are something to be concerned about.

New or Mismatched Paint

A freshly-painted accent wall in your living room is a good idea. On a car, however, you want all the paint colours to match, and fresh paint isn’t always a selling point. Like new or mismatched carpet, new or mismatched paint is an indicator that repairs have been made, which could mean that the car was in an accident. While some accident damage can be repaired, other accident damage can make owning that car a headache and a seller that’s trying to camouflage accident damage is not someone who you want to deal with.

Take a close look at any used car with fresh paint or paint that isn’t quite the same on all the body panels of the car.

Unlicensed Dealer

If you choose to purchase your next vehicle through a dealer, research the company and ask for proof of licence. Licence credentials ensure that you are purchasing from a dealer that is legally approved to sell you a vehicle. If a dealer is unable to provide you with proof of their licence, do not purchase a vehicle from them.

An Anti-Inspection Seller

Getting a prospective new car checked out by an independent mechanic is just good sense. While you’ll spend money ($250 or so) on the inspection, avoiding a used car lemon is more than worth it. Any upstanding used car seller should consent to have the car inspected by someone you choose. If the seller refuses to let you have the car inspected or insists you use their mechanic find someone else to buy from. Having a car inspected is a routine part of buying a used car, so sellers who refuse it may not be on the level. That’s a deal you can feel good about walking away from.

Smelly Interior Masked by Car Perfume

If a car’s interior is overly perfumed, the seller may be trying to hide mould or mildew smells. The vehicle may not be watertight if there are mould smells inside the car.

There are three common places where mildew smell can originate from:
• Dashboard — where water can build up as part of running your air-conditioning
• Body Leaking — in cracks from weatherstrips around doors and windows
• Leaking Drainage — such as those found in A/C and sunroofs

Alternatively, the previous owner may have been a smoker and caused odour damage to the interior upholstery.

Rectifying smells and damaged wet mouldy carpets and interiors is an expensive exercise.

In general, an excessive amount of air freshener in a used vehicle may be a reason to walk away from the deal.

Pre-purchase Car Inspections in Melbourne, VIC

Have a professional inspector like German Precision to do a thorough pre-purchase car inspection to ensure that your dream car is operating properly and not a scam.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

sources: mynextcarbuyingadvocacy.com.au, autoversed.com

Buying a Used Car: Common Car Selling Scams You Need to Know!

An online car scam is circulating Victoria and it has already had multiple people trying to buy a second-hand car that does not exist. Classified scams trick online shoppers on classified websites into thinking they are dealing with a legitimate contact but it is actually a scammer.

The public has been alerted by Victoria Police after 8 people fell for the scam, losing thousands of dollars after ‘buying’ the car advertised on a popular website. Someone claiming to be a member of the armed forces was advertising the car. 

You might think that scams disproportionately affect older generations. However, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) statistics show that ages between 25 and 55 are being hit the hardest.

So what you need to know before buying that dream car of yours?

Continue reading “Buying a Used Car: Common Car Selling Scams You Need to Know!”

Top 4 Car Maintenance Tips for Summer

Aah, summer. A great time to hit the beach and strut your stuff in shorts and thongs.It’s the perfect time of year to take advantage of the season’s longer days by taking a drive along the coast, or through the city. Relax as you cruise along, listen to your favourite tunes and check out the nightlife.

However, before you can enjoy the perks of Australia’s gorgeous summer weather, you’ll need to make sure your car is in good shape. After all, you don’t want your summer plans interrupted by a breakdown, do you?

You can prevent costly car repairs by following these simple summer car maintenance tips!

Cooling System

The greatest cause of summer breakdowns is overheating. The cooling system should be completely flushed and refilled about every 24 months. The level, condition, and concentration of the coolant should be checked periodically. (A 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water is usually recommended.) DIYers, never remove the radiator cap until the engine has thoroughly cooled! The tightness and condition of drive belts, clamps, and hoses should be checked by a pro.

CAUTION! – Never remove the radiator cap when the engine is hot – boiling coolant under pressure could cause serious burns.

Tyres

Your safety rides on your tyres – literally. They are the only parts of your vehicle that are actually in contact with the road, so it makes sense to keep them in their best possible condition.

Under or over-inflation of your tyres is dangerous and can lead to excessive tread wear. Check your tyres monthly to ensure correct tyre inflation and adjust the pressure according to the placard on the driver’s door jamb.

Make sure there is at least 3mm of the tyre tread remaining (have a mechanic check if you’re not sure). If under 3mm of tread left, your tyres need to be replaced. Also, ensure your spare tyre is properly inflated and in good repair in the event of a flat.

Fix the Check Engine Light

The most common problem you’re likely to experience is an illuminated Check Engine light.

It tells you your car’s not healthy in one way or another, yet doesn’t provide the exact mechanical issue.

Avoid the urge to ignore your Check Engine light. While the problem could be as minor as a loose fuel cap, it could be a major problem that could cost thousands to repair if not addressed quickly, or worse still, leave you stranded.

Brakes

Brakes should be inspected as recommended in your manual, or sooner if you notice pulsations, grabbing, noises, or longer stopping distance. Minor brake problems should be corrected promptly.

BONUS: Get a Complete Vehicle Inspection

Before you head out on a summer trip, organise an overall vehicle inspection. Get your battery and charging system tested, have all the fluids, brakes and lubrication points checked, and have the steering and suspension components looked over.

Have a professional inspector like German Precision to check all the mechanical and electrical systems to ensure they are operating properly.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

sources: autoguru.com.au, ase.com, exchange.aaa.com

How to Test Drive a Used Car

Once you have compiled a shortlist of cars that meet all your needs and wants, it’s time to go test driving. 

Whether you’re buying a new or used car, one of the most important steps in the process is, of course, the test drive. But sometimes a quick spin around the block just doesn’t cut it. With the salesperson or seller at your side and a speed limit of 50km/h, can you really make a solid decision on whether this is the car for you?

A short test drive near the dealership is a good start, but an extended test drive is better, allowing you to live with the car for a few hours or longer. At a minimum, make sure the test drive includes everything from parking and low-speed maneuvering to urban, arterial and, if possible, motorway driving.

Before you drive off, it’s important to know what you might be liable to pay in the event you’re involved in a collision during a test drive, such as an insurance excess. Before you sign a test drive agreement, make sure you read it to ensure you’re comfortable with all the conditions.

In a new car, the test drive will help you determine whether you like the driving feel and comfort of the car and whether it’s a practical fit for your needs.

A used car test drive is a bit different in that you’re also looking for mechanical faults or other issues that may have arisen as a result of wear and tear or poor maintenance.

Before the test drive

Strangely enough, the driving part of the test drive is only a small part of the experience. So as tempting as it might be to jump right into the driver’s seat and get out on the road take your time and do these things first.

Give the car the once over
Familiarise yourself with everything about the car.

• Open the boot and check how easy it is to get at the spare wheel (or if it has one)
• Open all the doors and climb into the back
• Fold down the rear seats (if possible)
• Check all storage compartments (make sure there’s enough)
• Try out the infotainment/audio system

While you’re doing all of this, you’ll notice how well each part functions. This will give you a general idea of the build quality of the car. It will also help you find any of those little things that might annoy you once the car is yours. If it annoys you on the test drive, then you can bet it will drive you nuts after a few months.

Sit in it for a little while
Now don’t get too excited, you’re not driving yet. You’ll want to make sure that you feel comfortable in the car and the best way to do this is to just sit there without the distraction of driving. Make sure the seat adjusts to fit your height and that you have pretty good visibility.

If you have kids, it might be a good idea to bring them along and have them sit in the back and tell you if it’s comfortable enough. They’ll want to be able to open and close the doors and get their seatbelts on easily.

Consider the test drive route
Ideally, you’ll want to take the car beyond the local neighbourhood and out onto the open road. Talk to the dealer/seller about where you’d like to go or if they know of a good route locally.

You simply can’t get a good feel for a car in a quick two-minute spin so taking it for a long drive is absolutely essential. It’s also not a bad idea to ask if you can take the car out once more at night. Night driving is a completely different experience, and you may notice some things about the car that you couldn’t have during the day.

Do you have a garage? Then ask the dealer/seller if you can drop by your house to make sure the car fits.

During the drive

Once you’re behind the wheel, you’ll need to pay close attention to these things:

1. Steering – Check the steering for excessive free play, pulling to one side or vibration, which could point to suspension or alignment problems.

2. Brakes – Ensure the car stops smoothly, strongly and in a straight line when the brake pedal is pressed. The pedal should not sink to the floor or feel spongy, and the steering wheel should not wobble or vibrate.

3. Exhaust – Check for noticeable exhaust smoke with the engine running at idle and under load during acceleration. Black, blue or white smoke each indicate different engine problems.

4. Engine – The car should run smoothly during accelerating, decelerating and when driving steadily. The water temperature gauge should remain in the safe range (or the temperature light should stay off). Rattling or knocking sounds might suggest incorrect tuning or engine wear.

5. Transmission – Check gear changes are smooth and decisive. On front-wheel drive vehicles, a knocking noise when turning indicates worn constant-velocity joints (CV joints).

6. Knocks and rattles – Listen for knocks and rattles as you drive, particularly over bumps and while turning, which could point to loose suspension or body components.

After the drive

At the end of the test drive, it’s okay if you’re not sure whether you want to buy the particular vehicle or model – you’re not under any obligation to buy it.

Once you’re back and parked, the dealer/seller will do all that they can to get you sitting down and talking about finalising that deal. They understand that if you just had a pleasant test drive, then it’s going to be pretty easy to push you into a decision. Don’t do it. Take time to reflect on your experience and to talk with whoever came with you on the test drive.

Even if you’ve fallen in love, it pays to take time to consider the options and try a few cars before you decide. Keeping emotion out of the process will help you negotiate more effectively, too.

This is a massive decision that you’re about to make so don’t allow someone to push you into making your choice on the spot. Go home, think about your experience, the extras available, and most importantly, the financial aspect. If it takes you a week to decide, then at least you’ll know you didn’t rush your decision.

Get it inspected by a professional

If you’re unsure, hire a professional like German Precision to help you.

When buying something big like a new car, have it professionally inspected. A pre-purchase car inspection would cost you $250 to $350, and it’s worth every penny.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

sources: strattonfinance.com.au, mynrma.com.au

Selling Your Car? Then You Need To Do These 9 Things First!

If you’ve decided it’s time to upgrade your wheels, you’ll likely need to get rid of your current ride.

Whether you’re buying new or used, putting some effort into preparing your old car for sale is vital and could make all the difference when it comes to how much money ends up in your pocket – to put towards that new purchase.

There are plenty of ways to sell your car (we’d recommend online classifieds) but no matter which course you choose, making sure your car is well presented will go a long way towards getting you the best possible price or deal.

To help, we’ve put together a selection of tips that will boost your chances at getting the right outcome.

1. Clean it up

Let’s start with the obvious. It sounds so simple, and it is – yet so many forget to tidy up before taking photos or letting someone view the car. Empty out any personal items and remove any rubbish. Don’t forget to check under the seats and clear out the boot.

A messy car looks uncared for and is unlikely to impress potential buyers. Ensuring there are no loose items will also prevent any unnecessary rattling noises that could deter interested parties. If your car is in pretty good nick, then giving it a thorough clean inside and out yourself, could be enough. Don’t forget the engine bay.

2. Detailing, and a cut & polish

If your car is looking a little worse for wear, then a more intensive clean may be required. Minor scratches, scuff marks and baked on bird-poo can be vamoosed with a cut and polish, while a detailed service will leave the inside and outside looking its best.

This can cost hundreds of dollars, depending on the level of attention needed, so you’ll need to weigh up whether or not spending the extra money will make the car more appealing to potential buyers without over-capitalising.

3. Minor repairs

Check the tyres are at the very least in a fair condition. Uneven wear, bald patches or low tread depth will certainly be noticed, it’s a massive deterrent for buyers and you’ll be handing them a bargaining point.

Uneven wear could point to bigger issues with balance or suspension, which would also raise red flags. And, let’s not forget, worn tyres aren’t roadworthy – so you shouldn’t have let them get to that point. Again, tyres are expensive, so if they are technically roadworthy but a little shabby, you’ll need to weigh up your options.

Windscreen wiper blades and loose or broken fixtures inside could be quick and cheap to fix, so take the time to check everything over thoroughly and repair or replace what you can within a reasonable budget.

It’s also a good idea to check the fluids under the bonnet and make sure they are clean and topped up. If your car is unregistered or unroadworthy, find out what is needed but don’t get it done until the sale is secured. Use it as a negotiation point when settling on a price with your buyer.

4. Check the paperwork

Different states and territories have different requirements when it comes to the paperwork you need to have in order before you can advertise your car for sale. Do your research and find out the regulations that are relevant to you – each state or territory has comprehensive information available online. For example, if the car is registered in Queensland, you’ll need to get and display a safety certificate.

Ask your service centre for a statement of service history. It should be free and, like a logbook, it’s a great way to prove that the car has been maintained regularly and correctly.

There are a few other things to ensure are in order – if finance is owing, know the final total payout figure inclusive of interest and fees, and if the car is still under warranty, find out how long is left and if it’s transferrable. The more documentation you have to prove the vehicle has been well looked after, the more at ease the buyer will feel.

The potential buyer might also ask for a range of information including proof that you own the car – for example, a receipt or driver’s licence details that can be used to conduct a search to confirm, registration number and certificate of registration, engine number, VIN (vehicle information number) or chassis number. In New South Wales, they’ll also want to see a current pink slip (safety certificate).

5. Know what it’s worth

Getting an idea of what your car could sell for is easier than it sounds. There are numerous online tools that can give you a valuation, including redbook.com.au or mycarprice.com.au that is run by glassguide.com.au and costs less than $20.

Or, you can shop around to see what cars of the same year, make and model, with similar kilometres and in similar condition are going for.

Keep in mind, you won’t get anywhere near the valuation if you decide to go with the trade-in option. Dealers need to be able to make their own profit when they resell it, after all.

6. Take quality photos

A picture is worth a thousand words, so put some effort into taking a great shot of your car. These days, mobile phone cameras are very good and you don’t need to be an expert photographer to pull it off.

Find a nice location, too. Although the beach background looks good, it could suggest to buyers the car has been exposed to moisture and salt. Instead, try a quiet street, near a park, or a rooftop carpark.

Also keep in mind that natural light is better early in the morning, in the evening or when it is overcast. Harsh sunlight creates glare and shadows.

7. Write an honest and descriptive listing

When you write the spiel to accompany your listing, be accurate in your descriptions and honest about any serious work that needs to be done.

Highlight the positives but don’t try and oversell your beloved pre-loved vehicle. Be honest but not brutally blunt about its shortcomings.

The upholstery could be well-loved, rather than faded and worn. People will read between the lines, and there’s no need to make it sound like a lemon if it’s mechanically sound.

A characterful, well looked after second-hand car is more realistic and attractive to buyers than something that sounds too good to be true – unless, of course, it has been impeccably maintained, in which case shout it from the rooftops and be prepared to prove it.

8. Ditch the stank

Finally, pop an air-freshener in the car before you let anyone near it. It may not smell funky to you because you’re used to it, but if it’s stinky it will make a bad first impression and, again, convey that you haven’t taken care of it.

Leaving food or messy spills to fester is disgusting and will leave a lingering stench for a long time, as will smelly gym gear that’s left to bake in the sun.

Few air-fresheners could handle all of that, though, and prevention is better than cure. So, while you’re going through the process, keep it clean and mop up messes as soon as they happen, and you might avoid ending up with a nasty smelling car that will turn people off instantly.

9. Protect yourself

Lastly, be sure to protect yourself against anyone with less than honest intentions. Ask to take a photo of their licence, and immediately email or message the photo to yourself or a friend.

Join the potential buyer on the test drive of your car and, if you’re worried about your safety, bring a friend along or ask a friend to follow behind. Likewise, arrange to meet away from your home if you’re worried about an unscheduled visit before or after the arranged meeting time.

It might be the worst-case scenario, but you can never be too safe. Be careful, be smart.

Good luck!

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

source: caradvice

Should You Buy A Car During COVID-19?

There is widespread confusion about whether you’re allowed to buy a used car during COVID-19, but the motor vehicle is one of the safest forms of transport amid the pandemic.

Used car prices continue to soar as commuters shun public transport, fearing COVID-19 contagion.

According to data analytics firm Datium Insights, used motor vehicle prices rose by 4.4 per cent last week after increasing by 2.1 per cent in the previous week, and the stock remains considerably low.

In terms of category, prices of SUVs rose the most, up 5 per cent, while passenger vehicles gained 4.7 per cent.

Among the top traded vehicles, resale prices for Toyota Hiace and Volkswagen Golf were up 10.2 per cent and 8.2 per cent, respectively.

Many new-car dealerships have adjacent used-car yards, but private buyers and sellers are also allowed to trade vehicles as long as social distancing rules are applied by both parties during test drives and the transaction process.

However, customers still need to be careful when buying a used car.

There seems to be a lot of car selling frauds, which is possible through a number of activities and actions taken by the company.

One of these is when the business does not disclose certain information. Many vehicles that are previously damaged/written off/hail damaged and repaired, HAVE NOT BEEN ADVERTISED as such. This is indicating a deceptive type of seller who is trying to present a vehicle unethically.

If the vehicle was totalled/written-off either due to accident/flood/hail damage and the insurance company signed off on a salvage title being issued for the non-repairable or defective car, this must be disclosed very obviously to the customer seeking a new vehicle.

This means that the person is notified either inconspicuous writing or told by the employees selling the car. Any attempt to hide this information may lead to legal action. This also means that the dealership is not permitted to say they don’t know about the salvage title.

The history of vehicles and the titles granted are easily accessible to auto dealerships, and this means they are held accountable for detailing that a salvage title was issued for a car. There is a duty of care held to the company for disclosing the salvage title to the customer. Many businesses that sell vehicles may attempt to hide these matters through various means. However, if the car works and there are no issues, they may get away with these practices. It is when the driver is harmed due to defects or previously damaged cars that litigation could occur. Also, the fact that if you paid normal retail for the car, in reality, it is worth considerably less. How much? No one really knows how to put a value on a ‘written off’ car. You also need to consider that some car insurance companies will not offer comprehensive cover on a previous write-off, along with the fact that at time of future sale, you will need to disclose this fact, and a trade-in may be impossible.

Common Problems With A Private Seller

The most common problems with buying vehicles privately include:

• ‘buying a lemon’, ie a faulty car
• being misled about a vehicle’s make, price, quality or performance
• the seller still owing money to a finance company, in which case your vehicle may be repossessed.
• buying a car that has WOVR (Written Off Vehicle Registry) entry, due to being a repairable write off (accident/flood/hail damage)

What To Do If You Have A Problem

Contact the seller and explain the problem before you do anything else. Always talk to the seller first. If they disagree or refuse to deal with the issue, get a report from a mechanic or inspection service like German Precision.

You should contact the seller yourself – or have someone else do it for you – if you have bought a vehicle and:

• were misled into doing so, either by false advertising or something the seller has said
• the vehicle is faulty or unsafe
• you find out there is money owing on the vehicle.

Often by contacting the private seller, you can work out an arrangement between the two of you. This might include:

• some kind of refund
• the seller paying for mechanical work
• an alternative arrangement.

It’s important that you don’t give up without trying. Note however there is no guarantee or obligation from a private seller to do anything. Once you have paid and the car has changed hands, it is all up to you and the seller bears no further liability.

Then How Do You Avoid These Situations?

Do Your Research

It’s important to get as much information as you can about the condition of the car before you buy it. Ask the seller to show pictures of the car from different angles. You can also video call them so you can actually see the real condition before paying anything.

Get It Inspected By A Professional

If you’re unsure, hire a professional like German Precision to help you.

When buying something big like a new car, have it professionally inspected. A pre-purchase car inspection would cost you $250 to $350, and it’s worth every penny.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

sources: theaustralian.com.au, caradvice.com.au, hg.org, consumerprotection.govt.nz

Buying a Used BMW: Don’t Skip the Pre-Purchase Inspection

A BMW pre-purchase inspection is important before buying any used car. But when you plan to buy a used BMW, Porsche or another high-performance European automobile, an inspection is even more essential before laying your money down.

Because these vehicles hold their value extremely well, even a used BMW will be an investment. Whether it’s a good investment or a bad one depends partly on doing your due diligence.

Request and review a vehicle history report, but don’t stop there. Contacting a local, independent pre-purchase inspector to schedule an all-important inspection will help ensure that your investment is sound.

Use an Experienced Inspector for Pre-Purchase Inspection

Even if your brother-in-law worked as a mechanic all his life, he may not be the right choice for your used vehicle inspection. Trust this important service to an expert who is experienced with high-performance, European cars.

Beware the seller who demands that you conduct your inspection with his or her mechanic of choice. Go into the transaction with the intention of paying for the pre-purchase evaluation yourself, and hold your ground on using the auto repair expert that you choose.

Pre-Purchase Inspection Tips for Success

If you plan on buying a used BMW long-distance (located in another city/state) or without a warranty, it is definitely a MUST that you get a pre-purchase inspection. A major risk is at stake if not.

If you plan to purchase a used BMW or another European car from a dealer, don’t let that dissuade you from getting an inspection from an independent inspector like German Precision. Don’t agree to have the dealer conduct the inspection.

Beware of Pre-Purchase Inspection Red Flags

Any used vehicle is likely to have a few minor flaws, and the older the car, the more issues you can expect. Depending on your time, budget and willingness to invest, you may agree to purchase a car that needs work. If you want to avoid the hassle, however, you can look for specific red-flag conditions.

If the car’s prior owner(s) did not stay on top of periodic maintenance, safety recalls and required repairs, proceed with caution. Likewise, if the vehicle has ever been in an accident, beware of potential frame damage. Vehicle history reports do not always include major, damaging events. It’s important to look for signs of water damage too.

Pre-Purchase Inspection Checklist and Price

Once your potential used BMW is being inspected by a BMW service provider, it’s common for a few minor flaws to show up on the pre-purchase inspection. Finding these minor flaws can actually help in the overall price negotiation process if you do buy the used vehicle.

A thorough inspection should cover over 125 items in the following areas (not limited to):

• Overall condition of the BMW
• Visual problems with the body and frame
• Leaks and broken components
• Engine analysis and problems
• Road test

The following past problems can be identified by a qualified BMW mechanic while inspecting the vehicle:

• Frame damage
• Poor repair work
• Car previously owned by a smoker
• Flood damage

Prices vary from BMW shop to BMW shop and are dependent on how thorough of a pre-purchase inspection you choose for your potential BMW. The more detailed and extensive an inspection, the more it will cost you – but the more it could save you in the long run.

In the end, it is worth the money purchasing a pre-purchase inspection, in the long-run, to avoid costly repair bills that can add up in the future. So buy your used dream BMW with confidence, knowing you’ve taken the appropriate measures and gotten a pre-purchase inspection.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

sources: bimmershops, wasatchmotorwerks

Understanding Pre-Purchase Inspection (PPI)

When excited buyers get emotionally caught up in the vehicle purchase, they often miss mechanical, cosmetic, and safety issues during visual inspections and test drives. These problems are compounded if the vehicle being purchased is located in another city and is purchased before being seen in person. To eliminate much of the anxiety and get an accurate picture of the condition of the vehicle, many buyers choose to have a pre-purchase inspection (PPI) done before the sale is final. 

When should I get a PPI?

A pre-purchase inspection is highly recommended when purchasing a vehicle without a warranty, or when the vehicle is located in another city. When there is no warranty, the buyer is immediately assuming all the risk in the event of a breakdown or major mechanical issue. For this reason, a qualified PPI makes financial sense. Vehicles in other cities present additional challenges when the purchaser is unable to take a test drive. With just a few phone calls, you can often arrange a PPI with a local shop where the seller can drop the vehicle off for a few hours. The resulting PPI report gives the buyer added security during a long-distance transaction.

Where can I get a PPI?

A pre-purchase inspection can be done by any competent mechanic or automotive technician who understands the vehicle you are purchasing. Automobile dealerships and independent specialty shops are excellent resources for a thorough PPI, and they will be familiar with the process. In addition to the traditional automotive shops, there are now national specialized mobile PPI operations that will inspect vehicles almost anywhere in the country. You can conduct an online search for “Pre-Purchase Inspection” to find larger operations.

What should be inspected?

Unfortunately, there isn’t an industry-wide accepted standard or schedule for a PPI. The cost of the inspection generally determines the depth and detail of the inspection. A basic inspection will be mostly visual, which includes putting the car on a hydraulic lift and checking for leaks or broken components. A more involved inspection will include a detailed road test where components such as steering and brakes can be assessed. A thorough inspection will include checking engine compression and a computer engine analysis.

How much should it cost, and who pays?

The buyer typically pays for the pre-purchase inspection. At German Precision, vehicle inspections starting at only $225 ranging up to $295 (most cars are $235-$265). For that price, you can expect a good overall mechanical and safety inspection (including a test drive) of the vehicle.

A detailed inspection of a complex luxury automobile, with extensive engine tests, could cost several hundred dollars or more.

The pre-purchase inspection is usually completed before the sale; however, in some negotiations, the sale is contingent on the completion of a satisfactory PPI. A clean report is an excellent sales tool, while a questionable PPI can end the deal. To be fair to both parties, both the buyer and the seller should agree on the terms of the PPI before the inspection takes place.

We hope we can help you out with your needs.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

source: jdpower

2020 Service Award

Thanks to your trust and support, GERMAN PRECISION has received another reward for our service. 

 

2020 Service Award
 

As the owner, I am truly grateful for the people who have chosen me to inspect their dream cars, and for the trust that has been built over the years. Hopefully, this award becomes the proof that we are honest and professional in what we are doing.
We are very fortunate to be able to help you throughout these years.

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact GERMAN PRECISION today!

Regards,
Klaus Sturm

prepurchasecheck.com.au
germanprecision.com.au
Phone: 0421 083 390
Email: info@prepurchasecheck.com.au

The Importance of a Pre-Purchase Car Inspection

For most people, purchasing a vehicle is the second-largest purchase they make in their lives. Just like a home, a vehicle is an expensive purchase and it is complicated. There are so many parts of the car that could be in need of repair. Some of those things could impact the safety of the car, too. And since most of us are not car experts, it makes sense to hire a professional automotive technician like GERMAN PRECISION to thoroughly check out a used car BEFORE you buy it. 

A pre-purchase inspection involves a lot more than just “kicking the tyres.” An automotive technician should examine the vehicle thoroughly. This process can take between 60-120 minutes, but usually, it will only take 90 minutes.

• Test drive
• Monitor checks
ab⚬ Computer system readiness monitors
ab⚬ Dash warning light and bulbs
• System checks
ab⚬ Battery and charging
ab⚬ Electrical
ab⚬ Exhaust
ab⚬ Exterior and interior lights
ab⚬ HVAC
ab⚬ Ignition
ab⚬ Radiator and cooling
• Mechanical checks
ab⚬ Steering linkage
ab⚬ Suspension components
ab⚬ Hoses & belts
ab⚬ Inspection for any fluid leaks
• Maintenance checks
ab⚬ Tires & brakes
ab⚬ Glass and windshield wipers/washers
ab⚬ Fluid levels and condition

If this seems like a lot, you’re right! It is! In fact, a thorough inspection should probably include over 200 checkpoints! When you are searching for a car, you are likely looking for the things that matter most to you: colour, make, model, number of doors, stereo, price, etc. The tangible things are what first attracted you to the vehicle. However, the unknown and hidden things are what can make your purchase a disaster. After all, what is under the hood and under the vehicle’s body are actually more important than how it looks on the outside when it comes to safely get you from point A to point B.

Scheduling a pre-purchase vehicle inspection should not be difficult.

Most sellers will let you take the vehicle for an inspection. If the seller hesitates or declines, this is not a good sign and you should probably walk away. It’s best if you are able to borrow the vehicle from the dealer or the private seller, schedule an inspection, and drive it there. If the dealer won’t let you drive the vehicle off the lot, ask if they would be willing to accompany you to the shop. A mobile inspection could also be an option, but those are often not as thorough of inspection because most will not lift the vehicle to check the ball bearings, components under the vehicle, and search for leaks.

When choosing an inspector, make sure he or she is an independent third-party.

Dealers have a bias toward not reporting issues on their vehicles. Repairing vehicles takes money out of their pockets, and they’d rather that money comes out of yours! No matter what, don’t take the dealer’s word for it. Get an independent inspection. Your best bet is to find an inspector who inspects vehicles for a living. Many repair shops focus on repairs, not inspections. Mechanics at those shops typically don’t even like doing inspections, so they will often rush through the process. You want your inspector to have a trained eye, focused on the task at hand. That’s what vehicle inspectors do! Also, make sure they take the vehicle on a test drive and lift it to thoroughly inspect the vehicle. When it comes to inspecting a vehicle, there are no short cuts.

Finally, make sure the inspection report is thorough and well-documented.

A report that is available online with photos is best. A piece of paper with a bunch of check marks on it used to be all you could hope for from an inspection. Not anymore! Transparency has become the standard in most industries these days, and the automotive world is starting to catch up. Make sure you get a high-quality report from a high-quality inspector.

While no inspection is guaranteed to find every flaw in a used vehicle, a trained eye will help you avoid serious problems. Given the fact that thousands of dollars are at stake, an hour of your time and the relatively low cost of inspection are good investments. If you can find an inspector that offers a warranty on what they inspect, even better! Let an independent expert focus on the mechanical aspects of the vehicle so you can focus on the fun parts of the car and have the peace of mind you deserve when you purchase your next used vehicle!

If you are looking for a professional pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision today!

source: bluestar.com