Inspecting The Tyres in a Used Car

Replacing a car is an exciting time for most car owners, and it is generally a large investment. A customer may have a number of queries, including the following:

“How far has it travelled?”
“Has it ever been used as a rental?”
“Did it suffer any damage or require any repairs?”

Many drivers buying a used car, on the other hand, may overlook checking the quality, pressure, and tread of the tyres, which could result in not only a significant cost in needing to replace them soon but also a higher cost if the tyres are unsafe.

There are numerous aspects to consider when buying a used car. Consider the vehicle’s and its tyres’ general condition. The condition of the tyres can reveal a lot about how well the car was maintained and operated. You may not want to consider it if the tyres don’t look good, or you may be able to use it as a bargaining tool if they do.

We have been in the automotive industry since 1984, ranging from apprentice to master technician, workshop foreman, controller, service advisor and service manager, in numerous premium vehicle businesses. We have built a level of loyalty that in the 21st Century is vital. After all, customer service and care is a point of difference.

We hope we are able to help you out with your needs. Our business is also known as Prepurchase Check.


Check Tyres Before You Buy

When purchasing a used car, inspecting the tyres prior to purchase is the best way to reduce the danger of having to pay for the replacement of unroadworthy tyres. Regardless of the conditions, very few sellers would compensate buyers for tyres once the vehicle has been purchased and driven away.

Tyres are considered a maintenance component that will wear out, as well as one that is in direct touch with the road environment and hence prone to harm – it is impossible to prove their condition when purchased days or weeks ago.

If you inspect the tyres before buying a car, you’ll have a better chance of having their replacement cost reflected into the price before you’re accountable for them. The condition of the tyres might also reveal how well the car has been maintained.

The use of different tyres on each corner suggests that it was done on the cheap and without much thought for best practices, as ideally, you should never mix tyres on the same axle. If the tyre has a date stamp that is significantly older than the car, it could mean that part worn tyres were installed, which is also cause for concern.

You could wonder if there were any additional maintenance shortcuts taken by the previous owner in order to save money on tyres. In fact, as you approach the car for the first time, a look at the brand and type of tyres fitted can be a quick appraisal of the care taken by the previous owner, or whether they have ‘skimped’ on service/repairs, by fitting ‘el cheapo’ tyres. Just because they are new, doesn’t mean they are good. You can’t expect quality/safety/long life and performance from a $100 cheapy when a normal brand name tyre is $200-400. Safety/handling/performance are all usually compromised.

What Is The State of Your Tyres?

In Australia, the permissible tread limit is 1.5mm. If the tread depth on your tyres has worn down to 1.6mm, it’s time to replace them.

Did you know that low tread contributes to your car’s loss of traction on the road surface?. Appropriate tread depth is required for good braking, cornering, and overall safe driving.
There are many things you can plan for on your vacation, but one of them is the weather. Good water dispersion is also required for effective water dispersion, which reduces the risk of aquaplaning.

The good news is that inspecting your tyre tread is a straightforward procedure. You may check your tread wear in a few different ways:

– Tread Wear Indicator: In the tread of every tyre is a tread wear indicator. As the tread wears down, this becomes more evident. When the tread wear indicator shows that the tread is worn level, it’s time to replace the tyres.

– Tyre tread depth gauge: a tyre tread depth gauge can be purchased at your local auto parts store. It’s critical to check the tread at least three times. Measure the tyre’s outside and inner sides, as well as the centre, being careful not to position the gauge on the wear bar.

– To check the tread depth, all you need is a coin and a few minutes. The coin trick: Using a 10c coin, you can place the coin in the tyre tread groove. If the outside band on the coin is still obscured by the groove, then it’s still legal. You can also do the same trick with a 20c coin and if the platypus’ bill is obscured, then the tyre tread is deeper than 3mm.

Do Your Tyres Have Any Cracks, Gouges, or Bulging?

Regular visual checks of your car’s tyres can aid in the detection of cracks, gouges, and bulging. These issues might cause your tyres to slowly leak or blow out, both of which you want to prevent at all costs.

It is suggested that you have a tyre inspected by a specialist if you discover a crack in the sidewall. A crack in the sidewall of your tyre indicates that it is damaged. Cracks and gouges considerably increase your chances of a tyre blowout.

A bulge on the tyre’s outside surface indicates that the tyre’s outer surface is deteriorating and is usually the result of a sharp impact/curb/pothole etc and indicates interior damage. It is strongly advised that you get a tyre that is bulging evaluated by a specialist. A quick blowout might be caused by weak places.

Keep an eye out for brittle, discoloured, or cracked tyres, as this is a symptom of sun damage and will shorten the life of the tyres.

Do The Tyres Show Signs of Uneven Wear?

A variety of reasons might contribute to uneven tyre wear. Tyres that are under or overinflated, as well as a faulty alignment, might cause these problems.

Tyres degrade over time as a result of driving. They will eventually deteriorate to the point that they are unfit for use on the roads, thus inspecting the tread depths and wear patterns is critical.

In all directions, run your palm over the tyre. Any irregularities in tyre wear should actually pop out beneath the flat of your hand.

It’s a clue that the wheel alignment is wrong if you detect wear on the inner/outer edges of both front and back tyres. Any other lumps and bumps could indicate that tyres need to be replaced.

Once a tyre reaches the age of five, it’s a good idea to keep an eye on it and get it inspected by a specialist. Any tyre made more than 10 years ago should be replaced, regardless of tread condition or look.

Always remember to inspect the spare tyre as well; you never know when you’ll need it!

In certain cases, cars do not have spare tyres, as they allow for a sealant gel and compressor arrangement to reinflate a leaking tyre, or the car may be fitted with RUN FLAT type tyres (commonly labelled, RFT or RSC), which may be driven on under certain conditions. Note though that if a car is designed to use run flat tyres, and no spare or sealant/compressor system is available, you will need to factor in getting the car towed in case you suffer a flat tyre – check this.

How Do I Know If The Tyres Are in Good Condition?

You can visually inspect the tyres yourself, looking for any cuts, bulges, lumps, and bumps. Remove any stones or foreign objects from the tyres, since they may be hiding or impeding a more serious problem. If the tyre appears to be damaged, do not drive on it.

If you still want to buy the vehicle, have the tyre evaluated by a tyre professional as soon as possible.

If you discover a problem with the tyres on a used car but still want to buy it, it’s worth factoring the cost of replacing the tyres into the purchase price to assure you’ll be ready and equipped to do so.

More importantly, the safety of you and your passengers is crucial, therefore if you are ahead with the purchase and feel the tyres are nearing the end of their useful life, have them checked by a specialist as soon as possible. You should seek the advice of a specialist who can correctly pinpoint the problem

If you are looking for the best pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

Source: tyresafe.org, continental-tyres.com.au, carhistory.com.au