A guide on car battery replacement and maintenance

Many people neglect the electrical system of a vehicle until it fails. But with some maintenance here and there you can save yourself money and time in the long run. Car battery failure is one of the most annoying problems that you can easily avoid if you test them regularly and replace them when necessary.

In this article, we will talk about how long do car batteries last? and how to avoid battery early failure, and what causes car battery failure.

 

How long does a car battery last?

On average, car batteries last between three and five years. Your battery’s capacity will slowly reduce over time. You should test your car battery after 3 years of use. Getting your battery tested often will lower the chance of you getting stranded due to a dead battery.

 

Car battery maintenance

Be sure to test your battery voltage regularly. The quickest way to test your battery’s voltage is by using a voltmeter. Purchasing your own digital voltmeters is the easiest to use. The voltage test should be done at least 12 hours after your car has been turned off to get the most accurate reading. Normally, A fully charged battery will typically display a reading between 12.4 and 12.8 volts. If your car battery voltage is anything outside that range. You should take it to a mechanic for vehicle inspection from a mechanic. Dedicated battery testers indicating health/state of charge and condition, are even better. And this is what your workshop will/should be using at each service – if not, ask them.

Secondly, Leaving your car unused for long periods of time will likely cause a problem with the battery not having enough time to recharge. Using your car more often will even make it in an optimal condition, It’s always good to take your car for a drive once every week if possible. This is because of the fact that it will help warm up your engine and circulate your fluids. If you won’t be using your car for a few weeks, it’s likely that the battery will need attention when you use it again. In many cases though, starting a car and then simply driving around the block or a few km, does nothing too little to improve the SOC (state of charge), and in some cases could be detrimental.

Thirdly, make sure to clean your battery regularly. A car battery with grime, dirt, or dampness will have a leakage across the casing to cause a short circuit. This is why you should keep your battery clean and dry! Doing this at least once a month will reduce buildup. The corrosion that accumulates on battery terminals and lead clamps is very common. Corrosion in the Lead clamps and terminals will impede the flow of electricity through the battery. Making sure to clear this grime or build-up is important in order to ensure that your battery lasts a long time and works efficiently.

Lastly, Powering up electronic accessories while the engine is off will discharge a battery more quickly. This is because when the engine switches off, your car’s alternator automatically shuts down and electronic accessories instead drain power from your car’s battery. One way to avoid this is to get into the habit of checking that everything is switched off every time you exit your car.

 

Signs that your car battery needs to be replaced?

it is best to take preventative measures if you are noticing a few signs that your battery might need a replacement. If you are finding your car reluctant to start, it could be a sign that the battery needs replacement. Additionally, If you notice your headlights seem dimmer than usual, it’s time to get the battery checked as It can be an early sign of weakness in the battery.

 

Contact a professional

To prevent your car battery from breaking down unexpectedly, it’s best to have it inspected by a professional vehicle inspector. The next time you go for a vehicle check service, ask the mechanic to check if your battery is working well and charging properly.

Unfortunately, German Precision focus on pre purchase car inspection only and we are no longer able to personally carry out services/repairs, however, due to our period in the industry, we can help refer you to trusted professionals who will look after you, or at least guide you with questions and support post-purchase car checks.

 

Things you should know about German Precision:

  • We provide a complete pre purchase car inspection for a fair, honest price. The car inspection is completely unbiased and honest.
  • We have been in the automotive industry since December 1984. Ranging from apprentice to master technician, workshop foreman, controller, service advisor, and service manager.
  • over 35 years of experience in multiple premium vehicle businesses
  • I am raised and trained in Australia, but I have gained experience working overseas. This includes work in Germany, Taiwan, South Korea. After this long time abroad I returned to Australia.
  • We offer our services across Melbourne and Victoria

 

 

Source supercheapauto.com.au and rac.com.au

Questions to Ask When Buying a Used Car

Privately purchasing might be intimidating, but it can also be rewarding if you ask the correct questions.

When buying a car privately, there’s a lot riding on getting it right. If you don’t understand the whole story before handing over your cash, credit card information, or a bank cheque, it can be a costly exercise.

However, it does not have to be a difficult or frightening process. A basic ‘audit’ of the car from its images in the ad can be the first step in the process of buying a car privately. Any obvious questions can then be directed to the vendor by phone or email.

We have been in the automotive industry since 1984, ranging from apprentice to master technician, workshop foreman, controller, service advisor and service manager, in numerous premium vehicle businesses. We have built a level of loyalty that in the 21st Century is vital. After all, customer service and care is a point of difference.

We hope we are able to help you out with your needs. Our business is also known as Prepurchase Check.


Be Alert and Don’t Get Complacent

The process of purchasing a used car has been revolutionised by online portals. It’s a lot easier now than it was in the ancient days, and finding the car you want is a lot easier. However, this does not imply that you should treat the purchasing procedure as a stroll in the park.

The ad won’t tell you everything you need to know about the car you’re considering. You’ll need to keep an eye out for certain less-obvious hazards.

Has the car already been heavily damaged, and was it restored by one of those shady shops that cut corners to save money?. That’s the first in a sequence of questions you should ask the owner.

Inquiring directly with the owner is the best approach to obtain this type of information. It’s crucial to remember, though, that you might not obtain a completely honest response. However, it is preferable to ask than to let the seller off the hook completely.

Checking the photographs of the vehicle stated in the ad before you start asking questions is one method to prepare yourself for the vendor being economical with the facts. Request an opinion from a friend who knows a little about the car you’re considering buying based on a visual inspection of the vehicle. Ask your friendly expert to come along and assist you with your interrogation of the owner if they’re willing. They might notice something in the owner’s response that doesn’t seem quite right and calls for additional investigation.

Examine The Images of The Car

Before contacting a seller, look over the images to save time and avoid unwanted conversation. It also allows you to get right to the point and receive the information you need.

Be cautious that photographs can make a vehicle appear much better than it actually is. Despite this, they are nonetheless capable of providing you with a wealth of information. Expand the image to see the gaps surrounding the doors, boot, and bonnet in greater detail. Is it even possible? Is there a difference in colour between the panels? Are the doors, bonnet, and back hatch/boot lid flush with the rest of the panels?

What isn’t visible in the photographs may be more significant than what is. Are there any important photos missing? Is there a photo of both sides of the vehicle, as well as the front and back, in the advertisement? What’s to stop you? Why aren’t there any interior or engine shots? Is it possible for the vendor to provide further photos?

By comparing it to photographs of similar vehicles, you may figure out what the body and cabin elements for that vehicle should be. Are there any details, such as wheels, insignia, or other objects, that fit the vehicle’s description? If not, inquire about any discrepancies with the vendor. Examine the under-bonnet photographs and compare them to similar models. Are there any differences in important components? Has the car been altered in any way? Is it in accordance with the description?

Take a look at the cabin images. Is the upholstery, trim, and other interior elements correct for the model and year? Check against similar models once more. Is the vehicle in good condition? Is the condition of the vehicle compatible with other assertions made about it? What else are you going to find if an owner can’t be bothered to prepare the car for photos?.

Our Job is to Ask The Questions!

The vast majority of vehicle owners will tell you the truth about their vehicles to you, the customer. They simply want to sell the car and be completely honest about it. However, approaching any transaction with a merchant with a suspicious mind will not harm your interests.

Before you get serious about making a counteroffer, there are some tell-tale indicators you should take note of and file away for later consideration. During a property settlement dispute, we’ve already highlighted the potential that the seller is not authorised to sell his or her partner’s car.

It has also been mentioned that there is a lot of damage. A car that has been in a serious accident and is almost but not quite written off by the insurance company can be a money pit, a nightmare of inconvenience, and a source of laughs among your friends and family. Don’t be afraid to inquire about noticeable paint overspray under the bonnet, especially near the firewall between the engine and the cabin.

A secondhand car that is sold within months after purchase because a family member dislikes it is another red flag. This is a popular justification given by phony repairers, backyard traders, and others.

Has it been touted as a ‘low kilometre’ example of the model? It’s not uncommon for instrument clusters to be replaced, with the odometer indicating a substantially shorter mileage travelled. Sellers should be particularly questioned if they’re willing to guarantee that the car’s odometer reading is accurate. Especially if the service documents have vanished without a trace. Do they have any other records to back up this mileage (for example, service invoices)? In Australia’s wrecking yards, instrument clusters with 70000 to 95000 kilometres on the odometer are in high demand.

When it saves them and your time, honest vendors who have a real automobile to sell will usually support you in this procedure. You may fine-tune your communication with the seller and save time for both sides by working through these topics.

What You Must Hear From The Car Seller

– What are the specifics of the vehicle they’re selling?
– Do those particulars correspond to the ad?
– Is the vehicle equipped with the characteristics you require?
– Is the year the car was first registered the same as the year it was built?
– What is the total number of registrations?
– Is there a current Roadworthy Certificate (RWC) on the vehicle?
– How long has the car been in the seller’s possession?
– Is the seller the sole owner of the vehicle?
– Is it legal for the owner to sell it?
– Has the car been in the seller’s possession since it was new?
– Who was the previous owner of the vehicle?
– What’s the point of selling?
– What is the mileage on the odometer?
– What is the seller’s assessment of the vehicle’s state?
– Has it been involved in a collision?
– Which sections of the car were damaged in the event of a collision?
– What was the location of the repair?
– Is there a warranty on the repairs?
– Is there any outstanding finance, or is it a lease agreement?
– What kind of ownership documents, previous registration certificates, service histories, and significant repair information can they provide?
– Has the owner lately replaced any parts?
– Has it been tampered with in any way?
– Are they willing to bargain if the price appears to be too high?

If you are looking for the best pre-purchase car inspector in Melbourne, do not hesitate to contact German Precision or Prepurchase Check today!

Source: carsales.com.au